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Columbia Personal Injury Lawyer > Blog > Truck Accidents > Driverless Trucks May Be Coming Soon To A Freeway Near You

Driverless Trucks May Be Coming Soon To A Freeway Near You

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Self-driving vehicle technology has been around for years.  The only thing that is stopping fully autonomous vehicles from becoming a frequent sight on highways and city streets is human hesitancy.  The newest cars on the road have so many autonomous driving features that they could probably drive themselves if you, or the vehicle manufacturers, would let them.  They can brake in time to help you avoid a collision, and they know exactly how to get into and out of a parking spot.  The gap between cars that can save you from yourself and cars that get from point A to point B without any interaction from you while you sit at home and become obsolete is bigger than it might appear.  It now appears that, even though self-driving cars are unlikely to appear on South Carolina roads anytime soon, it may not be long before you see driverless trucks transporting freight on I-26.  To find out more about your rights in the event of a truck accident, including one involving a self-driving truck, contact a Columbia truck accident lawyer.

Self-Driving Commercial Trucks: The State of the Art

Aurora, an autonomous truck company, is currently testing its driverless tractor-trailers on test tracks, with the goal of having them start driving intrastate routes in Texas later this year.  The plan is for the trucks to drive at a consistent speed of 65 miles per hour on the highways throughout their route, adjusting their speed only when speed limits or traffic conditions require it.  Each truck is equipped with 25 cameras and sensors so that it can detect all 360 degrees of its surroundings.  The tests show that the trucks, in their current form, can detect a pedestrian-like obstacle on a dark road at a greater distance than a human trucker could see a pedestrian if the only light were streetlights and the truck’s headlights.

Thus far, there have been 21 accidents involving self-driving trucks, three of them involving Aurora vehicles.  Almost all of these were caused by cars rear-ending self-driving trucks.  None of these accidents resulted in severe injuries.

What Happens If Someone Gets Injured in a Collision With a Driverless Truck?

The biggest danger is that the safety regulations are set by the truck manufacturers themselves.  Federal and state traffic safety laws tend to operate on a “crash now, regulate later” basis.  If you get into a collision with a self-driving truck, there is no at-fault driver but you.  You have the right, though, to file an insurance claim with the truck manufacturer and seek damages for your medical expenses and other accident-related financial losses.  The best way to ensure that you get a fair settlement is to work with a personal injury lawyer.

Let Us Help You Today

The premises liability lawyers at the Stanley Law Group can help you if you have suffered a serious injury because of a preventable accident involving a self-driving vehicle.  Contact The Stanley Law Group in Columbia, South Carolina or call (803)799-4700 for a free initial consultation.

Source:

wistv.com/2024/04/29/tractor-trailers-with-no-one-aboard-future-is-near-self-driving-trucks-us-roads/#lvldya6e8s80wmwx7qh

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